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Grazing

Find out how to improve livestock production while maintaining the value of the soil and land.

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The focus for graziers has always been on forage quality in meeting the nutrient requirements of pastured cattle.

The content of crude protein, neutral- and acid-detergent fiber (structural carbohydrates), water-soluble carbohydrates, crude fiber and minerals in a specific forage has been used for estimating forage quality and for formulating supplemental concentrate rations.

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Cattle prices are down from the last couple of years, and that will intensify the urge to save money. The cost of hay and feed for winter supplementation is the largest expense cattle producers incur.

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Fall and early winter forage can be limited in some parts of the U.S. In addition, backgrounding of calves on pasture can be an integral part of a feeder calf development and marketing program.

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This article is the second in a two-part series. Click here to read part-one in the series.

In the last issue of Progressive Cattlemen, several issues regarding the use of native warm-season grasses as a forage tool were considered – adaptability, establishment, longevity, drought tolerance and yield.

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When a livestock producer living in a “fescue belt” state goes to the doctor, even for routine health care, what happens?

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This article is the first in a two-part series. Click here to read part-two in the series.

Through the years, you may have heard any number of things about native grasses and the role they can play in a forage program. Some comments I have heard include, “they won’t grow around here,” “they are very low-quality forages” or “they are about impossible to establish.”

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